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A young man yells out "slut office! Instead of calling us prostitutes, whores, sluts — I consider us ladies of the night. It's a fing job, eh? And give it for free? I'm protected in here. I'm not doing nothing that I'm going to get myself sick about. They can go to a bar and get totally sloshed, meet some guy and think 'oh, he sounds cool, he looks nice' — and yeah, some of them are — but then you wake up in bed and think 'oh f!

Renee has three children. Her eldest is 25, her second son just turned 17 and her daughter is Aside from her eldest son, they don't know what she does and think she is unemployed.

On nights she works — which don't come that often — she says she is going out with friends. And to cater for their needs — extras like clothing, shoes, school; education is so expensive.

I can't afford their wants but their needs I can give to them in little portions. You could come in five nights of the week and not get jobs on three. You'd be lucky to get a job one night of the week. Popping up around the country are upmarket brothels that charge more and claim to treat their ladies with respect.

Places like Bon Ton. A BBC documentary awarded it the title of 'best brothel in the world'. Clients look at the website or talk to the managers about suitable girls and then book from there. She can tell when a client is used to lower-end brothels, calling up and making specific, coarse demands.

You didn't mention anything of a name or a brain or a personality so I figured it wasn't a requirement'. All of a sudden the tune changes and he goes 'oh sorry, I guess that was a bit rude of me'.

You should show respect for yourself and respect them too. Sure, they're' paying for it, but it doesn't mean you're a victim and they're taking advantage of the situation. It's the way we've been raised and conditioned. Sex work is actually pretty boring, she says. A typical client will sit for 10 minutes, break the ice, have a drink and shower. At the top of a fancy apartment overlooking the Auckland viaduct is the office or mini brothel of escorts Jacky and Vannessa.

They have separate houses but come here for work and offer bi-double sessions, advertising on the NZ Girls website. A research report by Gilian Abel, which interviewed sex workers, found that in Auckland, Wellington and Christchurch where the majority of sex work happens , 54 per cent work in brothels, 30 per cent work privately and 18 per cent on the streets.

She had previously worked in brothels Femme Fatale and the famed Flora's, an Auckland red-light institution which closed in That's the way it should be. It gives more power to the girls. You have to provide your own premises, but it's not hard to hire an apartment. It's much more beneficial to work privately — the parlours don't take half your income. Most girls advertise on NZ Girls, Jacky says.

The website owns the market and workers get discounts for advertising on it exclusively. You can bump uglies with people, but you can keep a distance. You don't have to cuddle. Getting your face in somebody else's face? It doesn't really get more intimate than that. Personally I think the two most intimate things you can do is kiss and sleep next to somebody. Everything else is just a handshake.

Beforehand, she worked in IT recruitment with high-up clients. I had a window of opportunity and thought this would be so easy, 11 years and it turns out it still is. Just go there and be your sweet self, put your nurse's outfit on and you'll be the cutest nurse in the whole of Auckland.

How I made marriage work. Behind the red lights of New Zealand's brothels Overseas media reported this week that New Zealand is the best place in the world to be a prostitute. We go behind the closed doors of our legalised brothels. Viewed Shared Commented Taranaki Crash: Losing four friends in Waverley crash 'just like losing family' How are real estate agents paid? The study, which initially conducted surveys and 24 in-depth interviews in , is being updated to cover another surveys and 18 in-depth interviews with the results due to be published later this year.

As well as aiming to demonstrate trends over time, the survey also examines topics like attitudes towards the law, the age at which subjects started buying sex, and their other sexual relationships. Chris Atchison of the University of Victoria designed both studies. He notes that the later survey includes more questions about the nature of buying sex and client experiences with sex workers.

UK researcher Teela Sanders, meanwhile, wrote a book discussing the phenomenon of paying for sex. In it, she notes: Sanders's book describes "push factors" - things like boredom, loneliness, or unsatisfying sex life - as well as "pull factors" like availability and opportunity that influence men's decisions to purchase sex.

With both in play, it certainly indicates that a straight "End Demand" approach, which only addresses pull factors but not push factors, could expect to only have a limited impact, and believing that forcing sex underground will make people not pay for it is incredibly naive. Interestingly, the research also suggests that one of the "pull factors" for men who buy sex is because it is illicit and they are attracted to the idea of getting away with it. No doubt while some people would be put off by criminalisation of buying sex, others would find the exact opposite.

And indeed in the US, where both selling and buying are criminalised, there's no indication criminal status does much to discourage punters. Don't want to know? Which brings us the big question or money shot, if you will: It seems that it is statistically less uncommon than most people imagine.

As with so many things, whether or not you actually broach the subject should be the topic of much thought. Like with the question of your number of ex-sex partners … would you really want to know?

Perhaps the best policy is, if the outcome would completely change the way you think of someone, then perhaps it's better left unasked.

The case for criminalising punters has lately been made by Labour MEP Mary Honeyball whose report on sex work was voted on in European Parliament last month. I watched Honeyball's vote as it streamed online. If you are the sort of person who thinks fans of policy and sausages should not watch the creation of either, I can assure you Brussels is absolutely the Heston Blumenthal of sausage-making: It passed, though it is only a symbolic victory.

It does not have the force of law. It does however signal a move in this country, following Rhoda Grant's failed bill in the Scottish parliament last year, to continue pushing the criminalisation of punters.

Do things need to change? Most people on both sides of the issue agree that yes, they do. But what's astounding are the column inches the 'Swedish Model' of criminalising punters has commanded when few if any benefits to public safety have been shown. For example, both saunas and the percentage of men who have bought sex have gone up since the law was made… oops.

Meanwhile, the 'Merseyside Model,' which instead proposes to treat crimes against sex workers as hate crimes, has gained a staggering number of signees to a key petition - over 50, at last count - but very little in the way of mainstream publicity. What the Merseyside police have done since is to categorise any reports of violence against sex workers as hate crimes. What this has helped achieve is an incredible 67 per cent conviction rate.

While some opponents of sex work are happy to categorise all clients of sex workers as potentially dangerous, the truth is that criminals use the stigmatised status to prey on the vulnerable while few real punters "turn violent".

And it has often been the case that murderers who whet their blade on women in sex work often go on to threaten other women as well. This was the crux of the criticism to do with the Jill Meagher case in Australia last year.

Meagher, an Irish national who was working for the Australian Broadcasting Corporation at the time, was raped and murdered in Melbourne. It emerged during the trial of her killer Adrian Bayley that he was also responsible for a string of attacks since But because his extensive history of violence was previously against sex workers, some suggested that was why he was never brought to justice before he could murder Jill.

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A controversial installation at Glasgow's Gallery of Modern Art is currently publicising entries from last year's 'Invisible Men' blog, which took selected quotes from escort review sites.

The online kickback from sex workers who objected to the political content of the display followed almost immediately.

But there must be something in the water right now as Woman's Hou r gave over an entire segment to promoting the 'Swedish Model' of criminalising the men who buy sex on last week and has dedicated lots of airtime this week to prostitution. The men who buy sex tend to call themselves 'hobbyists' or 'punters', the anti-sex work types call them 'Johns', and sex workers call them 'customers' or 'clients'.

But who are they, and why do they do it? They look like shelters for hikers in a national park, but these wooden sheds in Switzerland aren't what they seem; they provide a discreet location for men to have sex with prostitutes. The majority of clients are men - both of male and female sex workers.

The famous Kinsey report estimated that over 60 per cent of US men had paid for sex, but that was the war generation - things would no doubt be different now. A paper from put the percentage of men in Australia who had ever purchased sex at 15 per cent, with about one in 50 overall having done so in the last year. There is a question of how accurate such figures are, though, because of the stigma attached to paying for it - with some estimates putting the real number closer to 20 per cent paying for sex at least once.

Right now Canadian research is being thrown into the spotlight by media, not least because the Supreme Court there recently rules to strike down all existing laws regarding prostitution thanks to the wonderfully coiffed Terri-Jean Bedford and her decade-long legal battle. The Sex, Safety and Security study has been polling buyers of sex and makes fascinating reading.

Canada strikes down anti-prostitution laws. Scotland's proposed sex bill 'won't protect sex workers'. Can European Parliament call a halt to it, as we know it? What's your sex number? Why are women still lying? Dominatrix Bedford, one of three current and former sex workers who initiated a challenge to Canada's prostitution laws, reacts at the Supreme Court of Canada in Ottawa.

The study, which initially conducted surveys and 24 in-depth interviews in , is being updated to cover another surveys and 18 in-depth interviews with the results due to be published later this year. As well as aiming to demonstrate trends over time, the survey also examines topics like attitudes towards the law, the age at which subjects started buying sex, and their other sexual relationships.

Chris Atchison of the University of Victoria designed both studies. He notes that the later survey includes more questions about the nature of buying sex and client experiences with sex workers. UK researcher Teela Sanders, meanwhile, wrote a book discussing the phenomenon of paying for sex. In it, she notes: Sanders's book describes "push factors" - things like boredom, loneliness, or unsatisfying sex life - as well as "pull factors" like availability and opportunity that influence men's decisions to purchase sex.

With both in play, it certainly indicates that a straight "End Demand" approach, which only addresses pull factors but not push factors, could expect to only have a limited impact, and believing that forcing sex underground will make people not pay for it is incredibly naive. Interestingly, the research also suggests that one of the "pull factors" for men who buy sex is because it is illicit and they are attracted to the idea of getting away with it.

No doubt while some people would be put off by criminalisation of buying sex, others would find the exact opposite. And indeed in the US, where both selling and buying are criminalised, there's no indication criminal status does much to discourage punters.

Don't want to know? Which brings us the big question or money shot, if you will: It seems that it is statistically less uncommon than most people imagine. As with so many things, whether or not you actually broach the subject should be the topic of much thought. Like with the question of your number of ex-sex partners … would you really want to know?

Perhaps the best policy is, if the outcome would completely change the way you think of someone, then perhaps it's better left unasked. The case for criminalising punters has lately been made by Labour MEP Mary Honeyball whose report on sex work was voted on in European Parliament last month.

It was too late for him to see women as sentient beings. He's never fallen in love with anyone, he admitted. What Germans really think about getting naked in the sauna.

He said he was shy and insecure, and found it difficult to meet women, saying that paying a prostitute for sex was simply easier than trying to form a relationship. But he said sex was better when it did not involve a financial transaction.

The few colleagues who he tells about his jaunts agree: And he said he thought the women he paid for sex seemed happy. The recent documentary which exposed unsanitary working conditions where Eastern European women were being forced to sell sex was not something Andrew recognised from his experiences.

They have terrible teeth and just don't look as good. He said he preferred the idea of having sex with German women - but that he hardly ever encountered them in brothels - they were mostly picking up customers on the street - something he found particularly stimulating. The larger German brothels presented a physical challenge of a different kind, he admitted.

But then again the variety of women — who linger, lingerie-clad, at their bedroom doors — was a plus. They're young, fresh, and full of energy.

Most can't be older than When asked, Andrew said he would rate himself around five out of ten in comparison, and admitted he was often unhappy being alone. So he will keep coming back to Germany to pay for sex, yet he said with a house in Florida and a steady government job, he would not be leaving the US. Which is not to say it shouldn't be. Search Germany's news in English. What Germans really think about getting naked in the sauna He said he was shy and insecure, and found it difficult to meet women, saying that paying a prostitute for sex was simply easier than trying to form a relationship.

Sign up for our free Today in Germany newsletter. Get notified about breaking news on The Local. Become a Member or sign-in to leave a comment. Make this small Mediterranean capital your next city break. Related articles 10 slightly injured after fire breaks out at Frankfurt Airport. Green party calls for free condoms for lowest earners in Germany. Thunderstorms in Frankfurt cause flight cancellations, train delays. French bank ordered to pay back German lender millions in massive tax fraud case.

German fashion icon Jil Sander looks back. Short candidates in NRW cannot become police officers, court confirms. Is Frankfurt really Germany's most dangerous city? Just how German have you become?

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